Amazon Photos Family Vault Albums

Amazon photos family vault albums
  1. Amazon Family Sharing Photos
  2. Amazon Prime Photos Family Vault Albums
  3. Amazon Photos Family Vault Albums For Sale
  4. Amazon Prime Family Photo Vault

Basically, the Family Vault is another way to share photos with five of your closest friends and/or family members—you can add any or all photos or albums to the Family Vault, and once added. Finally move those family photos from your old laptop, your phone, and your desktop so they’re all together in one safe place. Features: - Auto-save photos for easy backup and to free up memory on your phone. Back up your photos and videos securely with Amazon. Share photos and albums via SMS, email, and other apps. Amazon Drive; Overview: Amazon Photos is a secure cloud storage service for photos and videos. Amazon Drive is a secure cloud storage service for most common file types. Function: Upload, download, view, edit, and create albums or share photos and videos. Amazon Photos app is a photo gallery, which displays images or videos from your. Amazon Photos offers unlimited photo storage to Prime members. These members can also invited up to five friends or family members, who will also get unlimited photo storage in Amazon Photos’ Family Vault. Amazon Drive is also included with your Prime subscription, offering 5GB of storage for videos and other content. Amazon Photos is a cloud-based photo storage option offered as part of the Amazon Prime membership package. Overall, Amazon Prime is a pretty good deal. Along with free two-day shipping and same-day shipping on some products, Amazon offers a host of benefits with its prime membership.

Today, Amazon is launching a selection of new Prime Photos features for its Prime members and their family in the US. The update is designed to help users better organize and share their photos with friends and family members.

Photos

For starters, Amazon is giving Prime members the ability to share their unlimited photo storage perk with up to five friends or family members, even if they’re not existing Prime members. Shared users can then contribute their pictures to the new private ‘Family Vault’, which can be viewed and updated by all the family. Amazon is also throwing in 5GB of additional storage for videos, documents, and other files.

To help make organizing a huge collection of pictures a little easier, Amazon has also updated its Prime Photos app with new search functionality. This can now be used to pick out pictures based on people, places, or object, much like the search options found in Google Photos. For example, users can search for pictures of a “sunset” or “wedding” and see accurate results. Customers can also browse photos of individual family members and friends in the People view, as well as search and filter by location or date.

Unlimited storage is already pretty great, but it’s still tough to beat a physical print out when you want to look over a few memories. Amazon customers can now order photo books, cards, and prints of pictures in their Photos account directly though the website. Amazon Print products start at just nine cents a print, ranging up to more than $19.99 for a photo book. All purchases come with free delivery for Prime members. You can find more about Amazon Prints here.

Of course, Amazon Prime is about much more than Photos. Members also gain access to free two day shipping, unlimited Prime Music streaming, and Prime Video exclusives. The membership fee sits at $99 each year or can now be bought for $10.99 per month.

[press]

Amazon Launches All-New Prime Photos Experience with Family Vault

Bringing valued memories together, Family Vault creates a private, easily-accessible home for photos and videos from multiple family members and devices

U.S. Prime members can now invite up to five people to join their Family Vault and access the benefits of unlimited photo storage, at no additional cost

Quickly find and rediscover your favorite moments across an entire photo collection with smart search technology

SEATTLE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Oct. 18, 2016– (NASDAQ:AMZN) Amazon today introduced new features to the Prime Photos service in the U.S., designed for Prime members and their family. Prime members can now invite up to five family members or friends to join their Family Vault, which includes access to Prime Photos benefits including unlimited storage of photos, plus an additional 5 GB for videos and other files. With the all-new Family Vault, bringing family photos together is as easy as one-click or swipe from a computer or mobile device. Customers can start using the new features of Prime Photos today at http://www.amazon.com/photos or through Prime Photos mobile apps.
“Prime members love the benefit of unlimited photo storage but often struggle to collect and organize photos across multiple devices and accounts into a single, shareable archive,” said David Nenke, Director of Prime Photos, Amazon. “We launched the Family Vault to make it easy for family members to safely store and share all their favorite moments.”
New Prime Photos features include:

  • Family and friend access to Prime Photos, at no additional cost: To ensure all the great moments and memories are preserved, regardless of who captured them, Prime members can now share their Prime Photos benefit of unlimited photo storage and 5 GB for videos and other files with up to five family members or friends.
  • Simple, private sharing through the Family Vault: FamilyVault members can add their favorite photos and videos individually with a click or swipe, or set their account to automatically add all their photos and videos to the Family Vault.
  • Smart search technology: Prime Photos’ new search technology makes finding photos based on people, places, or things a snap. Gone are the days of customers wading through thousands of photos to find a specific image. Looking for pictures from a vacation or wedding? Search for “sunset” or “wedding” and relevant photos will show up. Customers can also browse photos of individual family members and friends in the People view as well as search and filter by location or date.
  • Photo printing with free delivery for Prime Members: Customers can now order photo books, cards, and prints directly on the web from their Prime Photos account. Offering a variety a ways to preserve memories, Amazon Print products start at just nine cents a print, and ships with free delivery for Prime members. Customers can learn more and order prints today by visiting www.amazon.com/printing.

More to Prime
Tens of millions of Prime members around the world enjoy the many benefits of Prime. In the U.S., that includes unlimited Free Two-Day Shipping on more than 30 million items across all categories, unlimited Free Same-Day Delivery on more than a million items in 27 metro areas and one and two-hour delivery with Prime Now on tens of thousands of items available in more than 25 metro areas. In addition to fast, free shipping, members have access to unlimited streaming of tens of thousands of movies and TV episodes with Prime Video, more than one million songs and thousands of curated playlists and stations with Prime Music, early access to select Lightning Deals all year long, free secure unlimited photo storage with Prime Photos and one free pre-released book a month with Kindle First. For more information, visit www.amazon.com/prime.
About Amazon

Amazon is guided by four principles: customer obsession rather than competitor focus, passion for invention, commitment to operational excellence, and long-term thinking. Customer reviews, 1-Click shopping, personalized recommendations, Prime, Fulfillment by Amazon, AWS, Kindle Direct Publishing, Kindle, Fire tablets, Fire TV, Amazon Echo, and Alexa are some of the products and services pioneered by Amazon. For more information, visit www.amazon.com/about.

[/press]In November 2020, Google killed off its long-standing offer of free, unlimited high-resolution photo storage to anyone with a Gmail account. The new restrictions on Google Photos make a lesser-known competitor, Amazon Photos, suddenly of greater interest.

Amazon Photos is free for anyone with an Amazon account, but without Amazon Prime membership, you're limited to 5GiB. But if you are a Prime member, you get unlimited, original-resolution photo storage at no additional cost. (Videos still have a 5GiB cap.)

There's also one gotcha on how the service can be used—according to the TOS, Amazon Photos is for non-commercial, personal use only. You can take photos, you can share them with your friends and family, and so forth—but you can't run a photography business on the service without violating its terms.

A not-so-new challenger appears

Amazon Photos isn't new—in fact, it launched six years ago, in November 2014. But with both iOS and Android offering cloud photo storage built into the operating system itself, Amazon Photos hasn't been as high-profile. Google's free, unlimited storage particularly made a third competitor seem like a non starter.

However, iCloud and Google both demand subscription fees now for more than a few GiB of storage. In Apple's case, you get 5GiB free; in Google's, 15GiB (including Gmail and Gdrive). While this may be enough for some people, it gives rival Amazon a fresh chance to shine.

Mobile app walkthrough

I installed Amazon Photos today and took it for a spin. It automatically backed up all 2,000 or so photos (and 4GiB of video) from my Pixel 2XL over the course of the day without any problem. It did not, however, do anything with photos that had been deleted from the phone's local storage but were present on the linked Google Photos account. (If you need to migrate photos directly from Google's cloud to Amazon's, you'll need to do so manually.)

Amazon Photos is available for use immediately, even while it's backing up your device photos in the background. It was quite responsive and functional during the backup and seemed to be indexing photos by image recognition nearly as quickly as they were uploaded.

Amazon Photos desktop app

There's also an Amazon Photos desktop app for Windows and macOS. For the most part, the desktop app is just a way to automatically sync photos from your PC just as you would from your phone. While you can use it to browse your photos, almost all actual work you'd do with them—including but not limited to editing—is done in a Web browser window the Photos app launches automatically as and when you need it.

If you don't want to automatically back up photos and videos from your PC, you don't need the desktop app at all—you can just visit Amazon Photos directly from your Web browser itself.

Editing photos

You can edit photos online, or within the Amazon Photos mobile app. (Selecting a photo to edit from the desktop app just launches a browser window.) I found the editor serviceable—it offers most of the same features Google Photos does, and they operate smoothly and quickly.

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There are pros and cons to both Google's and Amazon's online editors, both of which err on the side of simplicity rather than feature-completeness. Amazon Photos, unlike Google, offers automatic cropping to common aspect ratios including square, 4:3, and 16:9. But Amazon's selection of filters seems loaded with not-very-useful crapola, with a significantly clunkier interface than Google's.

Google also gets the win in general image adjustments. Amazon offers adjustments to brightness, saturation, contrast, gamma, clarity, exposure, shadows, and highlights—but they're all manual. There is no counterpart to Google's generally excellent, one-size-fits-all 'auto adjust.'

Amazon offers text captioning in its browser-based editor, which Google does not—but the typeface selection is limited and pretty crappy. The default 'Open Sans' is fine, and Oswald is a perfectly serviceable option if you prefer sarifs—but most of the rest seem like the kind of weird crap you'd find in a 1990s desktop publishing program.

The mobile editor on Android is largely similar to the online version pictured above but with a few more options and a slightly more polished interface. In particular, it offers stickers, overlays, and free-form doodling, none of which are present in the browser version.

Hardcopy, merch, and decor

Amazon Family Sharing Photos

Amazon Photos Family Vault Albums

Amazon Prime Photos Family Vault Albums

Both Amazon and Google offer prints, books, and hangings based on your photos and albums—but I have to hand the decisive win to Amazon in this category on sizes, styles, options—and for the most part, price as well.

When buying photo prints, Google only gives you one choice—the size of the print, which can be 4×6, 5×7, or 8×10 inches. After choosing a size, Google offers you a selection of local photo printing services—all drugstores, in my area—and sends your photo off to the drugstore for you to pick up later.

Amazon offers photo prints in Glossy, Matte, Lustre, or Pearl finishes in sizes ranging from 4×5.3 inches through a whopping 20×30 inches and ships them to you directly—and the prices are better, too. Google charges $2.84, $2.99, or $3.99 for an 8×10 print in my area, depending on which service I choose—Amazon only wants $1.79 for the same print in either matte or glossy finish.

Google also offers a canvas wall hanging print option and a photo book option. Amazon offers both of those—along with photo cards, calendars, wood panels, aluminum prints, mugs, blankets, mousepads, Christmas ornaments, and more.

Of course, you can use independent print-on-demand services no matter who houses your photos.. but if you just want to click in your album and make it happen, Google doesn't even seem to be playing in the same league as Amazon when it comes to physical merch.

Image recognition assisted search

Amazon's image recognition assisted search works quite well—easily on par with Google's and possibly better, for many categories of object. When searching my photos for 'cat,' each service got some that the other missed—but Amazon detected more of them by far. (Both services also had trouble figuring out the difference between my cats and my dog—but to be fair, the dog herself has the same problem.)

In particular, Amazon's image recognition is almost uncannily good at picking out cats in the background—even when they're very small parts of the image. In the first picture in the gallery above, it found my gray tabby Mouser in the shadows, nested into my clean laundry, much of which is the same color as he is. In the second, it found the creepy, Siamese-cat-shaped 1950s TV lamp on a knick-knack shelf in my office. Google didn't win at 'find the cat' in either case, or in many others.

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When it comes to detecting humans and putting names to them, Google comes in at a huge and unsurprising advantage—it knows who I am, who my wife is, and who my kids are.. all by name. It even knows one of my cats by name, although it doesn't seem to have learned who the other cat or the dog are yet. Amazon doesn't know any of this.. which may be either feature or bug, depending on where your personal privacy<-->convenience slider is set.

Google chrome jitsi. Should you want Amazon to have a better handle on who your family and friends are, you have the option of applying names to faces in its People dialog, where it will show you a selection of faces it has discovered in your photos. It's still not as good at facial recognition as Google is, though—it only found me in 37 photos and my daughter in seven, while Google found pages upon pages of both of us.

Amazon Photos Family Vault Albums For Sale

Albums, sharing, and Family Vault

Amazon Photos allows you to organize your photos into albums and to share those albums selectively with friends, family, and/or the entire Internet. Contacts can be organized into Groups, so you don't need to share albums to twenty different people in your family every time—you can make one 'family' group and just give that group access to the albums they should be able to see.

You can also offer group membership by way of a special link, rather than directly by contacts—send somebody the link to join an Amazon Photos group (or publish that link in a blog post) and, presto, they click the link and get immediate access.

There's also a 'Family Vault' whose purpose wasn't spelled out very clearly within the app itself. Basically, the Family Vault is another way to share photos with five of your closest friends and/or family members—you can add any or all photos or albums to the Family Vault, and once added, all up-to-six of you can see them. More importantly, your five friends and family get unlimited Amazon Photos storage of their own by way of your Prime account.

As long as any one of the members of a Family Vault has a Prime account in good standing, all six share unlimited storage for their own photos. All Family Vault members are able to add—or, crucially, not add—their photos to the Family Vault, just like the original member does.

Conclusions

As a Prime member—and owner of an aging Pixel 2XL that is starting to have its own cloud storage limits imposed—Amazon's offer of free and unlimited photo storage to Prime members caught my eye. I've been using Google Photos as an automatic backup service for the photos I take with my Pixel for a while now, and it performs admirably.. but the new limits make me nervous.

After spending a day playing with it, I can tell you that Amazon Photos works perfectly well for my needs, and I suspect it will work for most Google Photos users' needs as well. It offers simple editing, including cropping, filters, level adjustment, and fairly flexible text captioning. You can organize photos into albums. Image recognition on par with Google's offers photo search capabilities if, for example, you want to find pictures with cats in them. And your mobile browser and social media apps will automatically 'see' your Amazon Photos account as a place to look when uploading photos, just as they do with Google Photos.

Amazon Prime Family Photo Vault

If you're a Prime member, you might want to consider Amazon Photos as an additional service, even if you don't plan to replace Google or Apple outright—it gets you a free, easy backup if nothing else. Accidentally deleted files from Google Photos will still be present on Amazon Photos.. and a catastrophic screwup made by the cloud provider itself won't reach across the aisle, either.