Git Merge Sourcetree

  1. What Is Sourcetree
  2. Git Cancel Merge
  3. Sourcetree Git Download
  4. Git Sourcetree Merge Branches

There are many benefits of having a source control. With source control we can check the history of a file, who and when modified a file, what was a reason for a change and which files changed together. Also with tags we can track important milestones.

Git is one of the most popular version control system, and Sourcetree is one of the tools that provide a visual interface and make it easier to work with Git.

In this article we will see how we can git rebase using Sourcetree. Rebase as opposed to merge can lead to a more readable git history.

Let’s start by creating a Swift project and make sure you select to create a git repository . Django xampp mysql.

Now let’s open the Sourcetree and tap on the local tab and then after scan a directory select the project you just created.

This video series teaches you Git version control without having to use the command line. As an interface, we use SourceTree from Atlassian and KDiff3 by Joa. Git config -global merge.tool sourcetree Now, git difftool and git merge commands will launch Visual Studio. Doing so is of course perfectly possible even without SourceTree. Just add the difftool and mergetool entries to your.gitconfig file (it should be located in your home folder) and execute the two git config commands shown above.

What Is Sourcetree

We notice that there is only one branch (master) currently in the repository.

By tapping on the branch button we can create a new branch, name it feature/aFeature.

Now let’s do a simple change and commit the changes.

Now let’s checkout the master branch and commit also a change

So far the git tree looks like this:

Let’s now rebase the feature branch on to master. Firstly let’s checkout on to the feature branch, then right click on the master branch and select rebase current changes onto master.

Now the git tree looks like this:

One clean stream of commits!

Worth notice that the commits from master although happened after the commit of the feature branch, after the rebase all commits of master are showing before all the commits of the feature branch.

Git Cancel Merge

Configuring SemanticMerge to be used as diff and merge tools for Git is rather simple. There are two options:

  • Configure it by using the git config commands.
  • Configure it by editing the .gitconfig file on your operating system.

Configure using git config commands

In order to configure SemanticMerge we will run the following commands:

Configure diff:

Which will produce the following .gitconfig file (except the [user] part that I added for completeness):

To invoke SemanticMerge as a diff tool, we're using the following command line:

semanticmergetool.exe -s $LOCAL -d $REMOTE

Whenever you run the semanticmergetool with only two params (left and right of the diff), it will work as a diff tool.

Run the following command to get help about the available params:

semanticmergetool -h

We enclose $REMOTE and $LOCAL (git params) in quotation marks to make sure the command is correctly invoked even if the paths contain spaces.

Important note: We used the C:/Users/pablo/AppData/Local/semanticmerge/ path for SemanticMerge. You will, obviously, have to replace the path with the right one where the semanticmergetool.exe is located in your computer.
Remark: Note that we run the command git config --global difftool.prompt false which will affect to all the difftools. This command means that whenever you run git difftool it won't ask you whether you really want to run the tool which we consider very annoying, but it is up to you to include this option according to your preferences.
Text diff: Using this configuration, SemanticMerge will use the included text based diff tool (called Xmerge) to compare the bodies of elements and text blocks. You can configure SemanticMerge to use any external tool you want. Check the Configuring external text diff and merge tools section for more information.
Configure mergetool:

Which will produce the following .gitconfig (except the [user] part that I added for completeness):

To invoke SemanticMerge as a merge tool, we're using the following command line:

semanticmergetool.exe -s $REMOTE -d $LOCAL -b $BASE -r $MERGED

Sourcetree Git Download

Where $REMOTE, $LOCAL, $BASE and $MERGE are git params with the following meaning:

  • $REMOTE - It's the file you're merging (also known as 'theirs' or 'source'. 'source' is the name we use internally, that's why the param is -s).
  • $LOCAL - It's the file you're merging to (a.k.a. 'yours' or 'destination'. 'destination' is the name we use internally, that's why the param is -d).
  • $BASE - The common ancestor of the two files. Git calculates the right common ancestor (or base) using its internal merge algorithms and does a good job (although our own Plastic SCM does even a better one :P).
  • $MERGED - The file where the merge result will be written.
Important note: We used the C:/Users/pablo/AppData/Local/semanticmerge/ path for SemanticMerge. You will, obviously, have to replace the path with the right one where the semanticmergetool.exe is located in your computer.
Remark: Please note that we configured two global merge settings that we consider useful:

But it is up to you to use them or not.

  • prompt means git won't ask you to confirm that you really want to launch an external tool when you run git mergetool to solve a merge.
  • keepBackup means git won't store .orig files.
Text merge and diff: By using this configuration, SemanticMerge will use the included text based diff and merge tool (called Xmerge) to compare the bodies of elements and text blocks and merge them. You can configure SemanticMerge to use any external tool you want. Check the Configuring external text diff and merge tools section for more information.

Configure editing the .gitconfig file

The final result is equivalent to running the commands, but you might prefer to edit the .gitconfig file directly. (Check the git documentation to locate .gitconfig. In Windows, it will normally be inside your user directory (c:userspablo in my case)).

Git Merge Sourcetree

The content of the .gitconfig file with SemanticMerge configured is:

Git Sourcetree Merge Branches

Important note: We used the C:/Users/pablo/AppData/Local/semanticmerge/ path for SemanticMerge. You will, obviously, have to replace with the right one where the semanticmergetool.exe is located in your computer.
Remark: We've configured optional global parameters like prompt (both for diff and merge tools) and keepBackup, but it is up to you to configure them this way or not.
Text merge and diff: By using this configuration, SemanticMerge will use the included text based diff and merge tool (called Xmerge) to compare the bodies of elements and text blocks and merge them. You can configure SemanticMerge to use any external tool you want. Check the Configuring external text diff and merge tools section for more information.
Note about file extensions: Git doesn't allow to configure external tools by extension (as Tortoise Git does). So if you configure the SemanticMerge, it will be run for all files when you decide to launch 'external diff or merge tool'. SemanticMerge will warn you if it is invoked with an unsupported file type. Then you will be able to launch the text based diff or merge tool. In case you want to skip this question and let SemanticMerge run the external text based tool, directly add the --nolangwarn argument.
Note about automated merges: If you want SemanticMerge to automate as many conflict resolutions as possible, then add the -a argument to the merge command as follows: